Proposed Copyright Law Could Make iPods Illegal

By | June 26, 2004 at 12:00 AM

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is mobilising the loyal will power of countless Apple users in a bid to get an anti-copying law stymied.

The EFF has realised that nothing is more scary than an Apple user who fears that his reassuringly expensive toy may be taken away from him. So the EFF has issued a press release that accuses the record industry of taking Job’s Mob to the cleaners.

The complaint, which mimics the format of an actual complaint that record companies might draft, points out that “Apple advertises that its 40 GB iPod can hold ‘up to 10,000 songs.’

“This amount of capacity far exceeds the total CD collection of the vast majority of Americans. This suggests that Apple knew and intended that iPod owners would be getting their music from elsewhere, including P2P networks,” the mock complaint says.

It names Toshiba as a defendant for manufacturing the hard drive used exclusively by Apple for its iPod and CNET for penning a review of the iPod that instructs users on how to copy music files between computers.

Fair’s fair, the Inducing Infringement of Copyright Act is being pushed at the behest of the recording industry which has monomaniacally dragged file-sharing grannies and children into court to protect its interests, so why shouldn’t the free speechers find people in the IT industry who have similar fanatical beliefs?

The mock complaint can be found here.

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