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Sixty-Second Secret, George R.R. Martin, Balticon

Life Ain’t Always Black Castles and White Walkers: George R.R. Martin at Balticon

George R.R. Martin. Photo by Nick Briggs.

Unless you’re actually a character in a 1950s film noir movie, nothing in life is ever truly black and white (and if you are one such character, 1. how on earth are you reading this, and 2. can we borrow that time machine you’re obviously using?). No, the human race is much more complicated than that. And one writer who has captured that complexity of the human condition better than most is George R.R. Martin. Yup, there’s a reason A Song of Ice and Fire series (that’s Game of Thrones to you TV people) is so damn popular, and no, it’s not because of the gratuitous sex and violence. Get your minds out of the gutter, y’all. We’re being literary here!

Geek Girl Riot’s Day Al-Mohamed attended Balticon’s 50th Anniversary in Baltimore over the Memorial Day weekend, where George R.R. Martin was guest of hodor honor. He discussed why he doesn’t write easy, black-and-white villains—and it’s not because most of them end up covered in blood. Listen in to hear Day recap what he said, and don’t worry, there aren’t any spoilers. Well, except for this one.

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Juuuuuust kidding. We would never do that to you. Never ever. We swear more solemnly than Brienne of Tarth. (Plus, every time someone reveals a GoT spoiler, George R. R. Martin kills another Stark. And, well… he’s running out of them.)

P.S. George, arguably one of the smartest, greatest fantasy writers of all time, has one final thought for you.

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Too soon?

 

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