True or False: The Michael Jackson Edition

By | June 28, 2007 at 10:06 PM

Michael Jackson is (a) bedridden; (b) convinced his brother Randy has been stealing from him; (c) getting evicted from his Las Vegas residence; (d) readying a European tour, or (e) none of the above. The answer, according to the reclusive entertainer’s hardworking spokeswoman, is “e.”

Raymone Bain issued a statement Thursday in response to a spate of recent published reports about Jackson that she called “untrue, defamatory and malicious in nature.”

Among the assertions denied by Bain was that Jackson was confined to his bed, or relying on any sort of medication, “including painkillers.”

“In fact, Mr. Jackson is doing very well, and conducted a meeting with his advisors yesterday, which included former Attorney General Benjamin R. Civiletti and Reverend Jesse L. Jackson Sr. among others,” she said.

Bain also shot down speculation that Jackson has suspicions about his older brother Randy dipping into his bank account behind his back.

“Mr. Jackson does not believe that his brother Randy Jackson has stolen monies from him,” she said, “nor does he believe that Randy, or any of his family members, would ever steal from him.” (Such speculation apparently surfaced after Michael testified in a recent legal case that one of Randy’s former advisors recommended some shady business deals.)

As far as Michael Jackson’s housing status goes, he has neither left Las Vegas, nor has he been evicted from his rented home, Bain said.

“He decided not to exercise the option to purchase the house. Period.”

He may not be scooping up real estate in Vegas, but that doesn’t mean he’s preparing to tour Europe, as some reports have suggested.

“There was no press release issued from Mr. Jackson’s organization regarding any European tour plans,” Bain said. “Despite reports to the contrary, Mr. Jackson is currently in the studio putting finishing touches on his music.”

Finally, Bain deemed any reports that Jackson is either losing or selling his precious share in the Sony/ATV catalogue “ludicrous” and “without merit.”

She indicated Jackson’s attorneys would be dealing with the individuals responsible for spreading falsehoods about the singer.

Of course, Jackson’s legal team currently has its hands full dealing with complaints from lawyers who have represented him in the past and were never paid for their services.

On Tuesday, an attorney for Jackson said he would agree to a judgment ordering him to pay $216,000 to a Torrance, California law firm that sued him last year for overdue fees.

Jackson hired the firm of Ayscough & Marar during his child molestation trial in 2005 to perform tasks such as obtaining court orders to delay discovery in civil cases and keeping information from being released publicly during the trial.

After a judge ruled that Jackson’s lawyers could not use many of the defenses they hoped to raise at trial, his attorney Marshall L. Brubacher agreed to a judgment against his client, stating it made financial sense.

Meanwhile, a Delaware-based law firm filed suit against the singer Wednesday, claiming he owes $110,000 for services rendered in a case involving a concert promoter who accused Jackson of backing out of two performances scheduled for New Year’s Eve 2000.

The firm of Abelson & Herron said in its court documents that it has “made repeated (but polite) demands” for Jackson to pay up, but that the singer has not responded.

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