Mexico Radio Stations Ban Some Music

By | July 19, 2002 at 12:00 AM

There will be no more drugs and violence on Mexican radio stations in and around Tijuana.

Baja California state radio stations signed an agreement Thursday to ban songs known as narco-corridos, and instead have decided to play only songs that promote positive messages and good values. They also urged Spanish-language U.S. stations across the border in California to do the same.

Casio Carlos Narvaez, a representative of the Radio and Television Industry Chamber, said stations will not be able to compete if their U.S. counterparts don’t take the same step.

“We should promote this self-imposed regulation to avoid converting into heroes and examples people who break the laws of our country,” he said.

Narco-corridos have long been popular in Tijuana, a city trying to clean up its image as a haven for drugs and crime. The northern Mexican folk songs chronicle the tales of drug lords to the backdrop of accordions and strumming guitars.

Other border states in Mexico have discussed similar bans, and many stations have already removed narco-corridos from the air.

Baja officials said their decision was an effort to help the government fight drugs and crime.

Mario Enrique Mayans, an industry representative in Baja California, said the stations wanted to be an example “in eliminating themes that go against good, moral customs and apologize for violence.”

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