Download Deals Play Music Videos

By | March 16, 2005 at 12:00 AM

Los Angeles – Fans will be able to build libraries of their favorite music videos because of deals set to be announced Wednesday (March 16) involving digital entertainment companies CinemaNow and MediaPass Network.

CinemaNow announced agreements with Warner Music Group, Epitaph Records and TVT Records to sell music videos on a download-to-own basis.

This marks the first time music videos will be made available specifically for Microsoft’s Windows Mobile-based secure devices, a category that includes Portable Media Centers, Pocket PCs and Smartphones from many different manufacturers. The videos also can be viewed on PCs and laptops.

The company is set to launch its new service,, on Wednesday (March 16) with 75 music videos but is scheduled to add more than 1,500 additional titles by December. Both new and catalog videos will be offered, including Jane’s Addiction’s “Been Caught Stealing” and Green Day’s “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” along with videos from the Hives, Alanis Morissette, Dwight Yoakum and others. Prices range from $1.99 to $2.99.

“We are thrilled to be working with the record labels as they explore this promising new revenue stream,” CinemaNow president Bruce Eisen said. “We are equally as thrilled to be working with Microsoft’s Windows Mobile division to continue to provide valuable content for their innovative product lines.”

Frank Barbieri, Microsoft’s group product manager, Windows Mobile Media, said the service will let consumers take music videos with them anywhere and enjoy them any time.

“This is the first time music fans can purchase videos the same way they do a music track,” he said. “It’s yours to own, so you can move it anywhere that supports Microsoft’s Plays for Sure.”

MediaPass is offering music videos on a different basis. It allows consumers to watch John Legend, Nas and many other artists online, charging them only if they want to put it onto their PC or portable device.

MediaPass Network CEO Daniel Harris said his service fills a void music labels leave between the promotional value of a video and its worth as entertainment content.

“Let’s let the end user stream it all day as long as they want, but if they download it and show it to their friends, then they pay for it,” he said. “If we can give fans video at a similar price point to just the music, who’s not going to want the hippest new thing?”

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